Case Knives

Case Knives

Website: wrcase.com

W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery has a long rich history of manufacturing high quality pocket knives that last generations. The company is based out of Bradford New York and they produce an array of knives such as folding pocket knives, fixed blade sporting knives, and collectible knives.

Company History

The company was founded back in 1889 when 4 brothers, Jean, John, Andrew, and William Russel (W.R.), started selling their knives in small villages in western New York. The brothers pedaled their knives out of the back of a wagon. In 1900, the brothers officially started the Case Brothers Cutlery Company. A while later, John renamed the company after his father William Russel and W.R. case & Sons Cutlery Company became a name that would be know for generations to come. The company settled in Bradford Pennsylvania in 1905 and has remained their since.

Case Knives throughout History

During WWI, Case started making knives for the U.S military. A few of the knives they produced for the military were the M3 Fighting Knife and the V-42 Stiletto.

In 1959, two astronauts named Gus Grissom and John Young took special knives that the Case Company created specifically for NASA.

The Case Company Changes Hands

In 1993, the Case Company was acquired by Zippo, another company based out of Bradford PA and is the current owners of the iconic knife brand.

Steel Types Used by W.R. Case

Case uses a few different types of steel including Chrome Vandium, Tru-Sharp Surgical Stainless Steel, Damascus, BG42, and 154CM. Case blades are stamped from domestic steel produced right here in the US, and are hardened using a proprietary heat treatment method.

Handle Materials

Case uses a few different materials to craft their pocket knife handles out of such as Brazilian cattle bone, India Stag, buffalo horns, mother of pearl, exotic hardwoods, and various precious stones. Case has even been known to make handles out of a much less common material, ancient Mammoth Ivory!

The other component of Case Knives are crafted from nickel, brass, and silver.

Collectible Case Knives

In the late 19th century, Case started using a unique tang stamp dating system, which led to the knives being valued by knife collectors. Aside from these old collectible Case knives, the company also produces collectible knives liscening from American Icons such as CocaCola, Johnny Cash, the Boy Scouts of America, John Deere, John Wayne, Brooks & Dunn, and many more.

Case also has an active collector’s club. The club was started in 1981 with a newsletter and around 400 members. Case has manufactured a special knife for the club – the Case Collectors Club Annual Club Knife – which was a Appaloosa Bone Large Trapper and made available to club members only. The club numbers over 18,000 people today.

Case Knife Patterns & Types

Case has stayed true over time to a select amount of knife styles such as The Slimlock, RussLock, CopperLock, Butterbean, Cheetah Cub, Tiny Trapper, Hobo, Sod Buster, Baby Doc, Mini Blackhorn, and the XX-Changer. Case has been adding a few new patterns over recent years. Here’s a bit more about a few of the popular Case Knife patterns.

The CopperLock – The CopperLock was introduced in 1997, and was designed by Tom Hart. The design incorporated elements of older patterns with a fully locking blade. In July of 2007 Case celebrated the 10 year anniversary of the CopperLock, and retired the pattern a year later in 2008.

The SlimLock – This pattern was originally introduced in 2005 as a triblute to The Case brother – John Russell Case. Each knife has a “JRC” tang stamp and a locking liner. The first batch of these knifes had blades crafted from BG42 Steel, and a second batch was released in 2006 using a patterned Damacus blade.

The Hobo – The hobo resembles a regular Trapper pocket knife when closed, but actually houses a knife, fork, spoon, and bottle opener. Just what every hobo needs! The original Hobo knives were released in the early 1900′s through 1940. They stopped producing this line in 1940, but re-introduced it in 1983.

Best Case Pocket Knives of 2014 & 2015

Name/ImageLearn MoreBrandRatingType of KnifeKnife StyleBlade TypeBlade MaterialBlade LengthOverall LengthClosed LengthHandle MaterialLock TypeWeightWarranty
128 Case Stockman Review

128 Case Stockman Review

view pricefull reviewW.R. Case & Sons Cutlery5 Star Average Rating EDC (Every Day Carry)StockmanClip Point, Spey, SheepsfootStainless Steel~~3 7/8"BoneNone2.9 oz.Lifetime Limited
02802 Case Peanut Pocket Knife Review

02802 Case Peanut Pocket Knife Review

view pricefull reviewW.R. Case & Sons Cutlery5 Star Average Rating EDC (Every Day Carry)Clip Point, Pen BladeStainless Steel~~2 7/8"BoneNone1.2 ozLimited Lifetime
02801 Case Medium Stockman Review

02801 Case Medium Stockman Review

view pricefull reviewW.R. Case & Sons Cutlery5 Star Average Rating StockmanClip Point, Spey, SheepsfootStainless Steel~~3 5/8"BoneNone2.5 oz.Limited Lifetime
083 Case Pen Knife Review

083 Case Pen Knife Review

view pricefull reviewW.R. Case & Sons Cutlery5 Star Average Rating EDC (Every Day Carry)Clip Point, Pen BladeStainless Steel~~2 5/8"BoneNone0.8 oz.Limited Lifetime
263 Case Canoe Pocket Knife Review

263 Case Canoe Pocket Knife Review

view pricefull reviewCase Cutlery4.5 Star Average Rating CanoeSpear Point, Pen BladeStainless Steel~~3 5/8"BoneNone2.9 oz.Limited Lifetime Warranty
161 Case Trapper Review

161 Case Trapper Review

view pricefull reviewCase Cutlery4.5 Star Average Rating TrapperClip Point, SpeyChrome Vanadium~~~Syntheticnone4.0 ozLimited Lifetime Warranty